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FortitudeGENERAL TOURIST TIPS FROM THE RECTOR:

The Church of Santa Susanna is open Monday through Saturday: 9 am -- 12 noon, and 4-7 PM. On Sundays we are open from 8:30 AM until about 12:30 pm. We have Mass (in English) Monday through Saturday at 6:00 PM, and on Sunday morning at 9 AM and 10:30 AM. Our office phone number is (01139) 06.4201.4554. The phone number for the Paulist Fathers is is (01139) 06.488.2748.

You can also get tickets for the Pope's Wednesday Audience in St. Peter's Square at Santa Susanna Church on Tuesday afternoons from 5-6:30 PM, but you must make reservations. Write to our Parish Secretary, Rosanna Shedid, at secretary@santasusanna.org The audience is usually at 10:30 or 11 AM, but even with a ticket, you should arrive at St. Peter's between 8 and 9 AM for a good seat. Please know that some people are sent a response from our Office, but because of your SPAM filters, you never receive it. It is suggested that if you haven not heard from us a week before your trip, you may want to call the office, or check in with us via email. And know that because of the volume of requests we only respond about one month before the audience itself.

Buy at least one good guidebook and bring it with you. Get a Rome map as well. The streets are complicated but with a good map you'll have no trouble. The street names are usually carved on the side of buildings and are hard to see if you don't know what you're looking for. This is a good reason not to rent a car and drive in Rome (the other good reasons are Roman drivers, motorini (motorbikes) and lack of parking.) For Guidebooks, I like Fodor's and The Real Guide. Some people enjoy Rick Steves (short and funny). Also, Rome in Detail from the International Herald Tribune.

Money: Before you go, get a few Euros from your bank, though it's not necessary. You can get them there at the airport. Euros are pretty easy as they're in denominations of 10 just like US dollars. Just remember that the dollar is a little stronger right now (January 2013 so if you spend 1 euro, you're really spending about $1.31 ( it changes daily). I recommend that you don't use Travelers' Cheques. Many places won't take them now -- and they're a pain to cash. Use your ATM card. Keep your card and your passport in a safe place. Don't be surprised when your hotel asks you for your passport when you check in and then keeps it for a while. This is normal -- they have to register you with the police in case you're a wanted criminal --you'll get it back. Beyond that, it is a good idea to keep your passport on your person at all times.

Hotels: Lower your expectations. Rooms in Italian hotels are much smaller and have less accoutrements than US hotels. Sometimes the shower is in the middle of the bathroom and usually you have to hold the nozzle. Just be happy you have hot water. And don't be surprised if you don't have air conditioning. Italians fear A/C as they think it leads to pneumonia -- they also fear ice in their drinks. All this is a good reason NOT to go to Italy in August or late July. I don't recommend hotels as (a) I've never stayed in a hotel in Rome and (b) when I did recommend a hotel a couple of times, my friends were disappointed, so no more. Everyone has different expectations -- so do your research, read your guidebooks, shop the internet. Just make sure that you're staying in town (Centro) and not outside of the central historic district. And please note that we are NOT ABLE TO ASSIST in obtaining reservations or in making RECOMMENDATIONS. AND, we do not provide rooms here at the Rectory or at Santa Susanna, despite what a few guidebooks say.

Dress: Americans are accustomed to wearing shorts and tanktops/low cut shirts -- especially when it's hot and humid. There'll be days when this is a good idea, but Italians don't dress this way -- ever, not even in the gym. The only exceptions can be seen on billboards. You will not be allowed into most Churches if you're dressed this way. Pants, skirts (at the knee) and tops with at least short sleeves. Don't undergo the humiliation and/or frustration of being turned away at St. Peter's. It's an argument you won't win.

Specific Information, Use the Index Above for Guidance:

AIRPORT SHUTTLES AND CAR SERVICES

Airport Shuttles to Fiumicino (Leonardo Da Vinci) or Ciampino are available from: Airport Connection at 06.338.3221 or www.airportconnection.it, Airport Shuttle at 06.4201.4507 or www.airportshuttle.com, or www.romeshuttlelimosine.com for 35 Euro. Airport services take cash only. An airport train is also available from the Termini train station.
And we can recommend the following car services:

One service we can recommend is DRIVEROMA, under the supervision of Mr. Tony Mancini. They have cars, vans and supervans, with service to Fiumicino AND Ciampino Airports to and from the Center of Rome. And also can provide clients with service to Civitiavecchio and many other locations. You can contact Tony Mancini at mancini.tony@alice.it or (+39)339.458.4206. His website is: www.driveroma.com

We also recommend Roberto Morelli, of Five Stars (limo & coach service)
Via T.Boetti Valvassura 80, 00139 Roma (Italy)
E-mail : rfmorelli@gmail.com Tel : (001)(39) 347.040.1676

Another service we recommend is that of GREENTRAVEL S.R.L.,Autoservizi, Via Papirio Carbone n. 49, 00178 ROMA, tel (+39)06.9799.7247 fax (+39)06.979.97248, greentravelsrl@gmail.com

Just remember always to confirm right before you are departing, and to get the name of the driver and a cell phone number .

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AMERICAN EMBASSY

While there are two official U.S. Embassies in Rome: one to the Italian government, and the other to the Holy See, American visitors in need must go to the U.S. Consulate, on Via Veneto 121 next to the American Embassy to Italy. The Consulate can provide the following: issue new passports; witness and notarize documents; help with legal formalities in case of death; inform your family if you are in difficulty; and provide a list of doctors and lawyers. The Consulate cannot give you money, settle your disputes, or get you out of jail. They can only ensure that you are being treated according to the laws of the host country. Tel: 06.46.741. Please remember not to bring a large backpack or bag as you will not be admitted or allowed to leave it outside due to security reasons.

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ANTIQUES
Some antiques, regardless of private ownership or foreign origin, are considered part of the patrimony of Italy and may not be exported to the United States. So before you buy that beautiful Etruscan vase, find out whether you will have to return to Rome each year in order to see it!

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AUTOMOBILES
Rentals are available from the following agencies: Maggiore at 06.488.0049, Avis at 06.481.4373, Hertz at 06.474.0389, and Europcar at 06.520.0811. To park on the street, look for the blue line parking spots. You will need to pay 1 Euro per hour and you can do this with the machines on the sidewalks, which will issue a ticket that you display on your dashboard. This is only for working hours. There are parking lots that charge 2,55 all day (if you can find them) or the much more expensive parking garages.

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BARS
Most bars charge different prices at the counter than at a table. You may want to check posted prices before sitting down, and decide if you feel it is worth spending $5 for a cappuccino and the pleasure of sitting at a sunny sidewalk cafe. Once seated, you may sit there for as long as you please. If you choose counter service, pay the cashier first. If you choose to sit at a table, the waiter will bring the check. Most bars have a toilet available for customers.

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BIKES AND SCOOTERS
Known in Rome as "motorini," they are the bane of poor pedestrians. We at Santa Susanna do not recommend them as they are very dangerous, but if you are determined to rent on, there is a rental agency in the Train Station and a complete list of rental places is available through the Public Tourist Office. Helmets are now required by Roman law!

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BUSES AND METRO (SUBWAY)
As of May 2012, the bus and metro tickets have been raised from 1 euro to 1,50! Forget the ticket machines in the Metro stations! You can buy tickets more easily at a BAR that has a giant T in front (T means they sell tobacco). Some of the newer buses and trams have a ticket machine on board which takes 1 Euro coins and do not give change, but you cannot rely on finding one. When you get on a bus, make sure you get your ticket stamped in one of the two yellow machines on each bus. Your ticket is good for 75 minutes and needn’t be restamped if you change buses. If you don’t do this, or if you don’t have a ticket, you run the risk of getting fined right on the spot (51 Euro). Waiting to contest the fine or to pay later will raise the fine to 104 Euro, or possibly up to 500 Euro. To enter the Metropolitana, you need your ticket to go through the turnstile. A ticket is good for only one ride on the metro. Be very mindful of pickpockets on both buses and the Metro. Please also see the section on PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION.

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BUS TOURS (SIGHTSEEING)
Many bus companies offer tours of Rome where you can ride and stop as you like. Information available at Tourist Information Kiosks. Also the ATAC city buses offer three different tours of Rome departing frequently from the ATAC stop in Piazza Cinquecento (in front of the Termini train station). Some tours are offered in English and tickets may be purchased on the "Stop and Go" buses. Prices vary for the 110 City Tour, Christian Rome and the Archeobus. See Public Transporation for prices and details. Tours outside Rome are offered by many agencies like Carrani on Via Orlando directly across the street from the Grand Hotel. Some of these tours are great -- especially the one to Pompeii. They start early (7:00 AM) and you get back to Rome at about 9:00 PM. There are tours to Capri and Sorrento as well.

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CAR TOWING If your automobile was towed away, you probably parked in an illegal zone. The way to find your car is to call the Vigili Urbani, (Tel: 06.67691), and give them the registration number, make of car, and place from which it was removed. They will tell you where to collect your car, but only after you pay the fine or multa. Pay the designated amount at the Cassa of the Vigili Urbani, Via della Consolazione 4 (Consolation Street!), or at a Post Office by Conto Corrente No. 54785001 in the name of the Comune di Roma – Commando Vigili Urbano, Servizio di Rimozione Veicoli. Take your receipt with you when you retrieve your car! Some Advice: Nothing is open Sundays, so don’t part illegally on that day.

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CHILDREN
The Commune of Roma has published a Guide to Rome for Curious Children which has wonderful suggestions for visiting public sites with children and a series of saftey tips. It can be found at most local Tourist Offices. The Villa Borghese has a children's movie theatre, The Children’s Cinema Dei Piccoli, that shows children’s films on Sundays. The Gianicolo (Janiculum) has a wonderful view - and a marionette show! The lake in EUR is surrounded by a large park with trees, grass, park benches, and lots of space to play and run.

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CHURCHES ( DRESS CODE AND HOURS)

Please remember that churches are primarily places of worship regardless of their fame as a tourist attraction. Dress accordingly (which means NO shorts, sleeveless or lowcut tops, miniskirts etc.) Don’t undergo the humiliation and/or frustration of being turned away at St. Peter’s due to casual summer dress. It’s an argument you won’t win. You can also be prepared with a shawl or wrap if you are in shorts or a sleeveless top.

Know that most churches are CLOSED between noon and 4:00 PM. They usually open again for three hours in the late afternoon. This can be frustrating for Americans as we’re used to a quick lunch and we’re ready to go again!. The Four Basilica's are open all day: Peter, Paul, Mary …. and John: Saint Peter’s, Saint Paul’s Outside the Walls, Saint Mary Major (Santa Maria Maggiore) and Saint John Lateran. The Vatican Museums (which is the only way to get into the Sistine Chapel) have limited hours. Go early and stand in line. GET UP EARLY. Plan on leaving your hotel no later than 8:30 AM. Otherwise the morning will go by and you’ll have missed everything!

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CIGARETTES
Tobacco stores or tabaccai exist by the thousands. Tobacco products are sold only in official shops since they are a state monopoly and price-controlled. These shops sell a host of other goodies including postage stamps, household matches, greeting cards, playing cards, and Autobus and Metro tickets. Smoking is now allowed only in restaurants with a separate smoking room or on an outdoor terrace.

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CLIMATE
Plan on damp, cold winters, rainy springs and hot and humid summers. So plan your wardrobe before you come. A beautiful Roman day is the best in the worldBefore you leave for your trip check www.weather.com for a 10-day Rome forecast.

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CREDIT CARDS
Credit cards or bank cards can now be used in ATM’s throughout Rome to acquire Euro. Check with your bank before you leave home. If your card is stolen, report credit card losses to: American Express (Tel: 800.864046), BankAmericard/Mastercard (Tel: 800.870866), Visa (Tel: 800.877232), and Diner’s Club (Tel: 800.864064). AMEX (Tel: 06.72282) Visa/MC (Tel: 800.151616). Notify your bank prior to leaving that you will be using your card in a foreign country to avoid being blocked.

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CRIME AND SAFETY

Like all big cities, Rome has its share of crime. Try to avoid wearing flashy, expensive jewelry, carrying open purses, or making your wallet easily accessible. Gypsies love to pick your pocket. While some of this is avoidable on the street, it may be more difficult to protect yourself on a crowded bus. Hold on tightly to purses and briefcases and keep them away from the traffic side of the street. Keep your eyes open on buses for suspicious characters – especially on the heavily traveled buses 64, 62, 40, 46, 218 and 23. Warn someone you think is a potential victim; as you would want such a warning. If your pocket is picked on the bus, start screaming as loudly as you can. The bus driver should stop the bus and lock the doors. Often if the pickpocket is still aboard, he will drop your wallet on the floor of the bus. Beware of walking late at night in the Colliseum, Campo dei Fiori, Santa Maria Maggiore, Termini areas or on the metro.

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CUSTOMS
Be aware that some food, dairy and agricultural products cannot be brought into the United States. Othewise you will lose that homemade sausage and cheeses that your relative gave to you. Check either before you leave the States or with U.S. Customs (Tel: 06.46741) for a list of items which you will not be allowed to bring into the US.

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE MOVIES:
These theaters always have a film showing in English: Metropolitan Multisala, Via del Corso 7, Tel: 06.3260.0500; Nuovo Olimpia, Via in Lucina 16/G, Tel: 06.686.1068; and Warner Village Moderno, Piazza della Repubblica, Tel: 06.477.7911. Check the Italian newspapers in the back or this website: http://www.inromenow.com/site%20templates/ArtsMovies.html Look for V.O (Original Version). The majority of English language films are dubbed in Italian. Often the film stops halfway through for a cigarette or snack break. Note that most American films show up here 3 – 9 months after they show in the U.S. and England. Also please note that during the summer a great majority of movie houses are completely closed.

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ENGLISH YELLOW PAGES:
An annual directory of English speaking professionals, organizations, businesses, restaurants and services in Italy. Free: Tel: 06.474.0861, Fax: 06.474.4516.

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GUIDEBOOKS:
Buy at least one good guidebook and bring it with you. Get a Rome map as well. The streets are complicated but with a good map you’ll have no trouble. The street names are usually on a marble plaque on the sides of buildings and are hard to see if you don’t know what you’re looking for. For Guidebooks, I like Fodor’s and The Real Guide. Some people enjoy Rick Steves (short and funny) or the Eyewitness Travel Guides (good photos and maps). Also Rome in Detail from The International Herald Tribune. Read your guidebook on the plane.

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HANDICAPABLE IN ROME:
Until the recent Jubilee Year (2000), Rome had not been very accommodating to the needs of handicapable people. At Santa Susanna for example, until 2005, we had been blocked by the Fine Arts Commission from installing a ramp access, because it would alter the great 16th century facade of the church. In addition, anyone who has attempted to use public ramps and other access points in public streets, face the real possibility of being run over by motorini who regularly and illegally use these points to take short cuts. For people with disabilities, or for the elderly, Rome has not been a friendly city! However, this is slowly beginning to change.

The Office of Social Policies for the Rome City Council has issued an exhaustive guide entitled Roma Accessibile, Guida Turistica per Persone con Disibilitá. While this guide is available for people who wish to write to: CO.IN. Cooperative Intergrate ONLUS, Via Enrico Giglioli 54a, 00169, Roma, Italia, we have another suggestion that might be easier.

This same material is available on the Internet in English. Simply use your web browser and go to www.coinsociale.it. When the homepage comes up, click on the British flag to go to the English version, and then click on the tourism button. Here you will find a data base that will answer most of the questions you have about access issues. This includes access points, restroom facilities, ramps and elevators. It will direct you to major museums, basilicas, and other public structures. It will give you information about restaurants and hotels that are accessible and tell you which subway and bus points can be used by handicapable people. It is the best Rome can offer and we recommend it.

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HORSE CARRIAGES
The carrozzelle are a very pleasant and comfortable way to visit Rome - but can be dreadfully expensive. Establish the price and time involved with the driver BEFORE the trip. Insist he fulfill his part of the bargain - and you'll do likewise. At Piazza di Spagna and Piazza Venezia, there is almost always one waiting.

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HOTELS
Lower your expectations. Rooms in Italian hotels are much smaller and have less accoutrements than US hotels. Sometimes the shower is in the middle of the bathroom and usually you have to hold the nozzle. Just be happy you have hot water. And don’t be surprised if you don’t have air conditioning. Italians fear A/C as they think it leads to pneumonia – they also fear ice in their drinks. All this is a good reason NOT to go to Italy in August or late July. I don’t recommend hotels as everyone has different expectations. Do your research, read your guidebooks, shop the internet. Just make sure that you’re staying in town (Centro) and not outside the central historical district. See our section, Get Thee to a Nunnery, for a list of economically priced convents to stay in located in the center. Most have a curfew though it is usually quite late and the nuns will serve your breakfast.

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HOTEL BREAKFASTS
Italian hotel breakfasts are light: cappuccino and a cornetto (like a croissant, but smaller) or roll and sometimes orange juice. Remember that coffee is a diuretic and that bathrooms are few and far between! Usually coffee with milk (cappuccino or caffe latte) is not served after 12 Noon, however most bars are accommodating to tourists (As are restaurants if you ask for butter with your bread, or ice with your beverages, but never parmesan cheese with fish pastas, or pastas with hot, spicy sauces.)

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INFORMATION
The Rome Tourism Office (Ente Provinciale per Turismo, tel. 06. 488.3748) is on Via Parigi, 5, close to Piazza della Repubblica (one block from Santa Susanna) and has wonderful free brochures and publications. City maps are free at McDonald's and the American Express office at Piazza di Spagna.

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IINTERNET
Rome now has a series of "Internet Cafes," that allow visitors to check their email or make long distance or international telephone calls rather cheaply. There is one in the Main Train Station and a complete updated list can be found at the Tourist Office. And there are more and more hotels and other places that are becoming Wireless.

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LAUNDRETTES
Called "Lavandarias," are available on Via Montebello, Via M. D'Azeglio, Via Dei Marsi, and Via Milazzo.

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LOST AND FOUND
Report lost items to Ufficio Oggetti Smarriti, Via Nicolo Bettoni, 1 (tel. 06.581.6040). Report items lost on a bus or Metro to their office on Via Volturno, 65 (near the rail station), and items left on trains to the Servizio Movimento delle Ferrovie dello Stato (tel. 06.4669, ext. 7682) at the main station.

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MONEY

Before you go, get a few Euro from your bank, though it’s not necessary. You can get them also at the airport. Euro are pretty easy as they’re in denominations of 10 just like US dollars. Just remember that the dollar is weak right now (Fall 2009) so if you spend 1 euro, you’re really spending about $1.45 (it changes daily, see http://www.x-rates.com). I recommend that you don’t use Travelers’ Cheques. Many places won’t take them now – and they’re a pain to cash. Use your ATM card. Keep your card and your passport in a safe place. Don’t be surprised when your hotel asks you for your passport when you check in and then keeps it for a while. This is normal – they have to register you with the police in case you’re a wanted criminal – you’ll get it back. Beyond that it’s a good idea to keep your passport on your person at all times.

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NEWSPAPERS/MAGAZINES

English language papers are sold at the large newsstands (edicole). The International Herald Tribune and USA Today are published daily except Sunday. The magazine "Wanted in Rome" comes out twice monthly, is widely available and has classified advertising, articles, and calendar events. "Tutto Citta" is a magazine accompanying telephone books and obtainable from the phone company. It is a gold mine of maps, useful suggestions, historical data, health services – you name it! The Roman Forum is also an English language magazine widely available and useful for monthly events and good general information on museums, etc. You can access both magazines online.

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PHYSICIAN

An English speaking doctor is available 24 hours a day at International Medical Services, Tel: 06.4882371, Via Firenze, 47. This is a private medical center with a fee and all doctors speak English. You may also call the American Embassy for a list of doctors at 06.46741.

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POST OFFICE
The main branch at Piazza San Silvestro is open from Monday thru Friday 9 AM – 6:30 PM and Saturday 9 AM – 2 PM. This is a multi-service post office and has, adjacent to it, international telephone service. Tel: 06.679.3304. Stamps (francobolli) are also available in tobacco stores.

For quick, efficient and courteous service, the Vatican post office may be used by anyone. There are offices off the right hand colonnade of St. Peter's Square near the newsstand, and to the left of St. Peter's Square near the Information Office. The Vatican issues their own beautiful stamps which must be used from their post office.

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PUBLIC RESTROOMS
Difficult to find! Try using the facilities of a well-heeled bar or restaurant when in need. By law bars are supposed to let anyone use it, even if you don't buy anything. Ask for the servizi or toilette. Note that they may be quite small, shared men and women, and of a different standard than you may be used to (two footprints and a hole in the floor!) and there isn't always paper available, so carry Kleenex with you. Some public restrooms are located in St. Peter's Square. If near a McDonald's, try using the restrooms there.

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RESTAURANTS
You've added up your bill and don't know why your amount and that totaled by the restaurant are different. You might have forgotten to add the pane e coperto charge, a per person "bread and cover" charge usually starting at about 2 euro. If there are 4 of you, coperto alone is 8 euro. Servizio or service charge - usually added by the establishment - runs between 12 and 15 percent. Ask if the service charge is included.

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SCAVI TOUR

The Excavations below St. Peter's (the Necropolis): This is the best tour in Rome and it only lasts about an hour, but you need reservations a good month or two in advance! (Don't wear shorts here either). Here are the rules: you have to be 14 years of age or older; you can't take pictures; you must be on time or forget it! To get reservations write to: scavi@fsp.va. Tell them you want the English tour, how many are in your party, and when you are available. The charge is around 10 Euro, which you can pay when you arrive at the Scavi Office. They'll send you back a confirmation email and a reservation time. The Scavi Office: when you are facing St. Peter's facade, go to the left side and you'll see two Swiss Guards and a small undercroft (tunnel). Tell them you want to go to the Scavi Office and they'll let you in and tell you where it is. Things may have changed with new security rules, but most of the Guards are friendly. Please know that some people are sent a response from the Scavi Office, but because of your SPAM filters, you never receive it. It is suggested that as soon as you arrive you personally visit the Scavi Office and see if you have a reservation. Often times you do, especially if you made the reservation months in advance.

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TAXIS

You can not always flag down a taxi like you do in New York. You have to go to a Taxi stand and take the first in line. Taxis are relatively cheap and a 5% tip is in order. At the train station or airport, ALWAYS GO TO THE TAXI STAND AND WAIT. These are the legitimate people. Do not use a taxi offered by someone approaching you in the terminal as they will rip you off – charging double or triple. See also the Public Transportation section.

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TELEPHONES
Public phones are located throughout the city and accept change or the ‘phone’ card (carta telefonica) sold in tobacco stores. It is wise to have a ‘phone’ card because money taking machines are becoming harder and harder to find and many public machines will accept only the card. These cards are inserted in a special slot on the phone, and allow the user to make calls for the amount shown on the card (usually 5 or 10 euro). Avoid calling overseas from your hotel room unless you have an AT&T, MCI or SPRINT card which links you directly with the States. For card calls with U.S.-based operators, dial AT&T (Tel. 06.172.1011), MCI (Tel. 06.172.1022), and SPRINT (Tel. 06.172.1877). You can always rent international cell phones before you leave home, or at the Rome airport.

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THEFTS AND LOSSES
IIf your passport, driver's license, airline tickets, or traveler's cheques are lost; report to the nearest Carabiniere or Polizia station (at the Questura on Via Genova and another station on Via Boncompagni near the US Embassy there are also special offices "per stranieri") to fill out a report or denuncia. This denuncia may be used as a temporary driver's license and must be presented at the Consulate for a new passport. Report lost Traveler's cheques to: American Express, Piazza di Spagna 38, (toll free – Tel: 1678.72000.) HINT: Whether you are a tourist or a resident of Rome, you might want to photocopy all valuable documents, charge cards, driver's licenses, etc. and keep these copies all together in a safe place in your home or hotel.

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TRAINS

The train station (Stazione Termini) has kiosks or windows where you can buy your reserved seat tickets.. Remember to validate your tickets in the stamping machine at the beginning of each track before boarding the train. Your ticket will give you a train number, a car number by class and a seat number on that car. A conductor will check your ticket enroute. Travel agents also sell train tickets. You may now book online at www.trenitalia.it and collect your ticket at the machine at Termini station using the code provided.

A great way to go to Florence (Firenze) for the day is to take the EUROSTAR train. Take the 7:00 AM-ish train for the 1 ½ hour trip. Go first or second class with reserved seats – there is very little difference. Have breakfast in the dining car and you'll be in the center of Florence by 8:30. You can see everything in a day – get reserved tickets online for the Uffizi Gallery, or at 055.294.883. See the David at the Accademia. Go to the San Marco Monastery to see the Fra Angelico's. See the Medici Tombs and the burial sites of Galileo and Michelangelo at the Santa Croce Church. Buy leather and stationary at the outdoor markets and gold on the Ponte Vecchio. Have a great lunch somewhere and take the 5:00 PM train back to Rome. A wonderful day ending with dinner in Rome. Day trips are also possible to Assisi, Siena, Naples etc. For Venice (Venezia), it's a five hour train ride, so you'll need to stay overnight or longer. The Eurostar station is directly on the Grand Canal. Jump off the train onto a vaporetto (waterbus).

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WALKING TOURS (IN ENGLISH)

On Wednesdays, walks are offered by the United Nations Women's Guild (UNWG) from 9:45 – 12:00 for 10 Euro. Contact Anne Marie Hupin at 06.503.1812.

For guided walking tours, we highly recommend our parishioner Brian "Kim" Dolan. He offers guided walking excursions, of various sites and churches in Rome, from a Catholic perspective. His website is: http://www.urbssacra.com You can contact him at bkdolan@gmail.com

The Associazione Culturale "Ulisse" organizes guided visits in and around Rome with qualified Art History, Archaeology guides in English, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, Dutch and Russian. Every last Sunday of the month at 8 AM, a visit to the Sistine Chapel is conducted. For information, Tel: 06.818.4090, Thursdays and Fridays.

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WORKING AND SHOP HOURS

IItalians have two work periods -- in the morning and in the late afternoon. They have a long leisurely lunch starting at 1:00, then either go for a walk or take a nap – ready for a fresh start at 3:30 or 4:00 until about 7:00PM. This is changing and now most stores in the main shopping areas have continuous hours. Many shops are closed on Monday mornings and/or Saturday afternoons.


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